New York City Quilt

I finally finished this quilt. I bought the panel a couple of years ago but had no idea how to turn it into a full sized quilt. But then my daughter asked for a quilt incorporating this panel and as mothers do, I obliged. I looked around for ideas and found some other panels with 9patch borders. I really liked that. And I had a second panel of Manhattan. So I made some borders – with parts of the second panel in the 9patch border and voilá – it worked out perfectly. I backed the top with batting and dark grey polar fleece and had a perfect birthday gift for cold winter nights.

If you want to make a quilt with a 9patch border the best way to calculate the size of all parts needed is to work from the inside out and then from the outside in. What does this mean?

I started with the size of my panel and then added borders until I reached the quiltsize I wanted. And then I worked backwards, adapting the width of the borders for easier cutting. The 9patch border was planned 8″ (20 cm) wide which means cutting the patches 3⅙” (8,17 cm). So I adjusted the 9patch border to a width of 6″ (15 cm) and I could cut the patchtes 2½” (6,5 cm). Much easier to do. But of course I had to adjust the outer grey border and make it 2″ (5 cm) wider. If you work back in from the outside you can finally adjust the size of the center panel so that everything will fit together perfectly. As a final step I sketched the whole top on graph paper with one square representing one patch of the 9patch.

If you still have a beautiful panel somewhere in your stash and you don’t know how to make a quilt out of it – consider this way of enlarging it. It’s quick, it’s fun and it only needs a few calculations.

 

BOM 2021: STAR #2

I hope you liked your Star #1 (if you do post a picture in the comments on my Facebook-page – we all would like to see it). Here is Star #2 of my free Block of the Month 2021.

Cutting
All the measurements include a seam allowance of ¼ inch (7,5 mm).
I also name the color I used to make it easier for you to identify the different pieces.

From the yellow fabric cut
18 squares 2 x 2 inches (5,5 x 5,5 cm) – cut all of these squares diagonally

From the dark blue (background) fabric cut
6 squares 2 x 2 inches (5,5 x 5,5 cm) – cut all of these squares diagonally
6 squares 3⅛ x 3⅛ inches (8,5 x 8,5 cm) – cut all of these squares diagonally
4 squares 2¾ x 2¾ inches (7,5 x 7,5 cm)

 

Sewing

Join a yellow and a blue triangle along the long side to get a two-colored square. Sew 12 squares.

Press (I pressed the seam allowance to the blue side). Cut off the dog ears.

Sew a yellow triangle to a blue side of the two-colored square exactely as shown in the picture. Align the bottom sides as shown and start to sew where my scissors point.

Sew another yellow triangle to the other blue side of the two-colored square exactely as shown in the picture. Start to sew where the tips of my scissors point.

Press (I pressed the seams into the yellow triangles). Cut off the dog ears if you want (I did).

Join each of the triangles you just sewed with a dark blue triangle along the long side. Cut off dog ears.

Now you have only squares to join.

Arrange the squares as shown in the picture.

Sew the squares into rows. Be careful not to change the squares or the orientation of the squares.

Join the rows and press the finished block.

Take 4 of the strips 10½ x 1 inches (28 x 2,5 cm) that you cut from the background fabric previously (see introduction to the BOM here) and sew 2 of them to opposite sides of your block. They are a little bit too long – shorten them to the block size. Sew the 2 remaining strips to the other sides of the block and shorten if necessary. Finished!

That was fun! And I really like this block. Imagine a whole quilt with this block, every star in a different color – yummy!

If you just found this BOM you can find the general instructions here and Star #1 is here.

I would love to see your finished star-blocks. Please post them in the comments at TheQuiltingSpace’s Facebook page, tag me on Instagram @thequiltingspace and/or use the hashtag #thequiltingspace.

See you in March for star #3.

 

I’m linking this to Off the Wall Friday, Can I get a Whoop Whoop and to Brag about your Beauties.

 

Valentine’s gift

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner so it’s really time to think about a gift for your loved one. How about making something different this time. Not a card, not a tag, but a cushion. A comfortable pillow, colorful and soft, big (65 x 65 cm / 26 x 26 inches) and with a broad floppy border, really easy and fast to sew.


Layer a piece of foundation fabric 28 x 28 inches (70 x 70 cm) with a thin piece of batting the same size. Put a piece of fabric 18 x 18 inches (45 x 45 cm) in your background color (here dark blue) in the middle of the batting. All measurements given include 1/4″ (0,75 cm) seam allowance

Sew border strips in 4 different colors around the background piece. The strips have a width of 1¾ inches (4,5 cm). Sew through all layers – sewing and quilting at the same time. Now sew border strips the color of the background around the piece. These strips are 3½ inches (9 cm) wide.

Make a template for the heart. Draw a square 6 x 6 inches (15 x 15 cm) and draw the heart into this square – so you get the right size for the heart if you want to put 4 onto the pillow. Cut out your template and draw it 4 times to the paper side of fusible web, reversing 2 of them. Cut them out roughly. Iron the fusible to the backside of your chosen fabric and cut out the hearts. Fuse them to the background piece and appliqué them by machine, appliquéing and quilting at the same time.

If you want to have more quilting now it’s the time. I was satisfied with quilting around the color-border and the hearts.

Iron. Cut the foundation fabric and the batting to the size of the top.

Cut 2 pieces of background fabric for the back of the cushion 26 x 18 inches (65 x 45 cm). On one 26 inches (65 cm) side turn the edge ½ inch (1,5 cm) to the left side of the fabric, iron and turn another ½ inch (1,5 cm) and iron again. Machinstitch this seam. Do this on both backside pieces.

Layer top with right side up and the 2 pieces of the the backside left side up on top of it. Align the edges of the top and the backside pieces. The backside pieces will overlap in the middle – that’s where the seams are. Sew all around the outside of the pillow, backstitching at the beginning and the end. Turn the cushion right sides out, iron and sew once again in the ditch between the colored and the uni borderstrips.

Put a pillow 20 x 20 inches (50 x 50 cm) in the cover. Done!

I hope you like this idea for a gift. And it’s not only for Valentine’s Day. Think about Mother’s Day, birthdays, a gift for your son/daughter at college, …….. So why not sew some more cushions while you are at it. Have fun!

I’m linking this to Off the Wall Friday and to Can I get a Whoop Whoop?

 

BOM 2021: STAR #1

Let the fun begin! Here is Star #1 of my free Block of the Month 2021.

(Click here to find all you need to know about this BOM.)

This is the sewing diagram of the block

Cutting

All the measurements include a seam allowance of ¼ inch (7,5 mm).
I also name the color I used to make it easier for you to identify the different pieces.

A = 1 square 2¾ x 2¾ inches (7,5 x 7,5 cm), yellow
C = 4 squares 2 x 2 inches (5,75 x 5,75 cm) cut once diagonally, pink
F = 4 squares 3⅛ x 3⅛ inches (8,75 x 8,75 cm) cut once diagonally, turquoise

In darkblue (background color) cut
B = 1 square 3½ x 3½ inches (9,75 x 9,75 cm) cut twice diagonally
E = 1 square 5¾ x 5¾ inches (15,75 x 15,75 cm) cut twice diagonally
D = 4 squares 1⅝ x 1⅝ inches (4,5 x 4,5 cm)
G = 4 squares 2 ¾ x 2 ¾ inches (7,5 x 7,5 cm)

Sewing

Let’s start with the “flying geese”.

Lay a turquoise triangle on top of a darkblue piece E, right sides together. Align the bottom lines. Start sewing at the bottom (where the scissors point).

Open the triangle and fingerpress the seam carefully.

Sew the triangle on the other side. Again alining the bottom lines and sewing from the bottom up.

Open the second triangle and you get one finished “flying goose”. Make 4 of them.

Sew the smaller “flying geese” the same way. You need 4 of them as well.

Press. I usually cut off the “dog ears” as I find the resulting patches easier to handle. But that’s up to you.

Now we start with the inner star. Sew 2 squares D in darkblue on either side of a “flying goose”. Make 2 of them. Sew the remaining 2 “flying geese” on the opposite sides of the yellow square A. Then sew the 2 other “flying geese” units to the other sides.

Sew the outer star exactely as you did with the inner star.

Iron and marvel at your beautiful block.

Take 4 of the strips 10½ x 1 inches (28 x 2,5 cm) that you cut from the background fabric previously (see introduction to the BOM here) and sew 2 of them to opposite sides of your block. They are a little bit too long – shorten them to the block size. Sew the 2 remaining strips to the other sides of the block and shorten if necessary.

These strips are our safety net. We will sew them around each block and when we’ve finished all 13 stars we cut them to exactely the same size so sewing them together will be a piece of cake.

I hope you had fun sewing this star. I would love to see your finished star-blocks. Please post them in the comments at TheQuiltingSpace’s Facebook page, tag me on Instagram @thequiltingspace and/or use the hashtag #thequiltingspace.

See you in February for star #2.

 

I’m linking this to Off the Wall Friday.