BOM 2021: STAR #1

Let the fun begin! Here is Star #1 of my free Block of the Month 2021.

(Click here to find all you need to know about this BOM.)

This is the sewing diagram of the block

Cutting

All the measurements include a seam allowance of ¼ inch (7,5 mm).
I also name the color I used to make it easier for you to identify the different pieces.

A = 1 square 2¾ x 2¾ inches (7,5 x 7,5 cm), yellow
C = 4 squares 2 x 2 inches (5,75 x 5,75 cm) cut once diagonally, pink
F = 4 squares 3⅛ x 3⅛ inches (8,75 x 8,75 cm) cut once diagonally, turquoise

In darkblue (background color) cut
B = 1 square 3½ x 3½ inches (9,75 x 9,75 cm) cut twice diagonally
E = 1 square 5¾ x 5¾ inches (15,75 x 15,75 cm) cut twice diagonally
D = 4 squares 1⅝ x 1⅝ inches (4,5 x 4,5 cm)
G = 4 squares 2 ¾ x 2 ¾ inches (7,5 x 7,5 cm)

Sewing

Let’s start with the “flying geese”.

Lay a turquoise triangle on top of a darkblue piece E, right sides together. Align the bottom lines. Start sewing at the bottom (where the scissors point).

Open the triangle and fingerpress the seam carefully.

Sew the triangle on the other side. Again alining the bottom lines and sewing from the bottom up.

Open the second triangle and you get one finished “flying goose”. Make 4 of them.

Sew the smaller “flying geese” the same way. You need 4 of them as well.

Press. I usually cut off the “dog ears” as I find the resulting patches easier to handle. But that’s up to you.

Now we start with the inner star. Sew 2 squares D in darkblue on either side of a “flying goose”. Make 2 of them. Sew the remaining 2 “flying geese” on the opposite sides of the yellow square A. Then sew the 2 other “flying geese” units to the other sides.

Sew the outer star exactely as you did with the inner star.

Iron and marvel at your beautiful block.

Take 4 of the strips 10½ x 1 inches (28 x 2,5 cm) that you cut from the background fabric previously (see introduction to the BOM here) and sew 2 of them to opposite sides of your block. They are a little bit too long – shorten them to the block size. Sew the 2 remaining strips to the other sides of the block and shorten if necessary.

These strips are our safety net. We will sew them around each block and when we’ve finished all 13 stars we cut them to exactely the same size so sewing them together will be a piece of cake.

I hope you had fun sewing this star. I would love to see your finished star-blocks. Please post them in the comments at TheQuiltingSpace’s Facebook page, tag me on Instagram @thequiltingspace and/or use the hashtag #thequiltingspace.

See you in February for star #2.

 

I’m linking this to Off the Wall Friday.

 

BOM ANYONE?

For 20 years I was a publisher of a quilting magazine and for all those 20 years we ran a Block of the Month. So I would like to follow this tradition and offer you a free Block of the Month on the QuiltingSpace.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

The theme for this year will be STARS. In the first half of each month you will get the pattern of a star block.

It will be a skill builder BOM – so we won’t always do it the easiest way.

I would love to see your finished star-blocks. Please post them in the comments at TheQuiltingSpace’s Facebook page, tag me on Instagram @thequiltingspace and/or use the hashtag #thequiltingspace.

Each block will be 10 x 10 inches (26 x 26 cm). The finished quilt will be approximately 56 inches (145 cm) square.

As the stars will be set on point in the finished quilt you will need 13 stars. That means you are in for a bonus star.

I will give you all the measurements in inches and also in centimeters. The centimeters will always be in parantheses for a better differentiation. The measurements in inches and centimeters will differ a little bit as I tried for more convenient figures for cutting and sewing than for the exactness of stars in inches and in centimeters.

For the stars I recommend to raid your stash.

For the background I will take the same fabric throughout.

The quilt will have a 6 inches (15 cm) wide border. If you want to do this border with the background fabric then you will need at least 3 yards (280 cm) of the fabric.

If you decide to make the border of another fabric you will need 2 yards (180 cm) of the background fabric and another 1 yard and 2 feet (150 cm) of the border fabric.

If you don’t mind to have seams in the border then you will only need 1 yard and 5 inches (110 cm) of the border fabric.

THE BACKGROUND FABRIC

Before we can start with the first star we have to cut some pieces off the background fabric.

All measurements already include ¼ inch (0,75 mm) seam allowance.

For all who want to sew the border with the background fabric (you need 3 yards (280 cm) of fabric):

From the length of the fabric cut
2 strips 48 inches (120 cm) long and 6½ inches (16,5 cm) wide and
2 strips 60 inches ((150 cm) long and 6½ inches (16,5 cm) wide
for the border

From the width of the fabric cut
2 strips 10½ inches (28 cm)
and from these 2 strips cut 52 rectangles 10½ x 1 inches (28 x 2,5 cm).
These rectangles will be sewn as borders around all the stars.

From the remaining fabric cut
2 squares 16½ x 16½ inches (44 x 44 cm) and
2 squares 9½ x 9½ inches (24 x 24 cm).
Put away those 4 squares and the border strips – we will need them later on to finish the quilt top.

The rest of the background fabric can be used for the background of the stars.

For all who want to sew the borders from a different fabric (you need 2 yards (180 cm) of the background fabric):

From the width of the fabric cut
2 strips 10½ inches (28 cm)
and from these 2 strips cut 52 rectangles 10½ x 1 inches (28 x 2,5 cm).
These rectangles will be sewn as borders around all the stars.

From the remaining fabric cut
2 squares 16½ x 16½ inches (44 x 44 cm) and
2 squares 9½ x 9½ inches (24 x 24 cm).
Put away those 4 squares – we will need them later to finish the quilt top.

The rest of the background fabric can be used for the background of the stars.

The fabric for the border will be cut lengthwise into 4 strips
2 strips 48 inches (120 cm) long and 6½ inches (16,5 cm) wide and
2 strips 60 inches ((150 cm) long and 6½ inches (16,5 cm) wide.
I recommend that you cut this fabric only when you need it to finish the top.

If you don’t mind seams in your border and have 1 yard 5 inches (110 cm) of fabric you will cut 6 strips 6½ inches (16,5 cm) across the whole width of the fabric.
I recommend that you cut this fabric only when you need it to finish the top.

NOW YOU ARE ALL SET to start with the first star. The pattern will be published on the QuiltingSpace on Friday, January 29.

I hope that many of you will join this free BOM. I promise we will have a lot of fun during the year and a beautiful quilt at the end of it.

 

Snow dyeing

Snow in Vienna! This is rather rare.

But at the moment we do have some snow and I seized the opportunity to snow-dye (is this a word?) some fabric.

I cut my fabric into fat quarters and soaked it in a soda ash solution.

Then I put the fat quarters into individual containers. I folded some of them and simply scrunched the rest.

I gathered some buckets of snow on my balcony …

… and covered the fabric with it.

Then I sprinkled some dye onto the snow (I used Procion MX). I used way too much dye – next time I will be more careful not to waste so much.

I put the containers in garbage bags and put them out on my balcony. The advantage – the whole mess was out of the way. The disadvantage (which might have been solved with a little bit of thinking in advance) – the snow did not melt. So after a few hours I took the bags inside.

The next day I was out all day and only got home in the evening. The snow on the fabric was gone and the water with the dye covered the bottom of the containers. So the fabric did soak up the colors from the bottom for a few hours which diminished the effect of the snow dyeing.

But after a lot of rinsing, some washing and ironing I got these beautiful pieces of fabric. I really love them.

In fact I like the colors so much that I couldn’t bring myself to throw away the threads that unraveled from the fabrics.

As the weather report promises some more snow in the next days I might start another snow dyeing session but this time I will put the fabric on a grill so that the melted snow can run through the fabric. I’m really looking forward to it.

I’m linking this to Off the Wall Friday.

 

Quiltshow: Road to California

Each year Road to California is one of the most eagerly awaited quiltshows. This year’s “in person” show was postponed to 2022 (January 19 – 22, 2022) but the organizers created a virtual experience called Road@Home.

Road@Home offers an abundance of quilting classes where everyone – from the beginner to the advanced, art quilters, modern quilters and quilters intending to open a business – will find at least one, but generally quite a few classes. And although the event will take place from January 20 to January 23, 2021 I think you can still register for some classes.

And now you are in for some real treat – the winning quilts of Road to California 2020:

https://online.roadtocalifornia.com/awardwinnersroad.php?con=31

You still want more? Here are the winners of 2019:

https://online.roadtocalifornia.com/awardwinnersroad.php?con=30

I assume you are as stunned as I am by all these beauties. And as inspired. So please excuse me I have to go and cut some fabric.

Call for entries

The International Quilt Festival in Houston is scheduled from October 28 to October 31, 2021. There are 5 calls for entries for this prestigious show. I give you the overview and you can find all the details at https://www.quilts.com/enter-your-quilt/.

 

HANDS ALL AROUND

Artists from all around the world incorporate influences from their own cultures into the design and technique of their quilts.

2 entries per person maximum.

Minimum width is 36” (91 cm). Maximum width or length is 96” (244 cm).

There is a $20 submission fee per quilt.

The works must be made between 2017 and 2021.

Submit 2 photographs for each piece (an overall photograph of the work and a close-up detail showing the stitching) and an artist’s statement that describes the inspiration for the work.

End of registration: May 21, 2021

 

IN FULL BLOOM

Just as florists and gardeners cultivate works of beauty from the soil quilters create beautiful pieces of art with fabric. This exhibition will showcase marvellous floral quilts in all the colors of the rainbow.

2 entries per person maximum.

Minimum width is 36” (91 cm). Maximum width or length is 96” (244 cm).

There is a $20 submission fee per quilt.

The works must be made between 2017 and 2021.

Submit 2 photographs for each piece (an overall photograph of the work and a close-up detail showing the stitching) and an artist’s statement that describes the inspiration for the work.

End of registration: May 21, 2021

 

IN THE AMERICAN TRADITION

Contemporary quiltmakers often look to the art form’s rich tradition for inspiration in their own works. This exhibit features quilts that incorporate traditional blocks, styles, and/or techniques.

3 entries per person maximum.

Minimum width is 36” (91 cm). Maximum width or length is 96” (244 cm).

There is a $20 submission fee per quilt.

Submit 2 photographs for each piece (an overall photograph of the work and a close-up detail showing the stitching) and an artist’s statement that describes the inspiration for the work.

End of registration: May 21, 2021

 

LANDSCAPE QUILTS

Landscapes often inspire artists, including many in the quilt world. Recently made landscape quilts will be featured in this exhibit.

2 entries per person maximum.

Minimum width is 36” (91 cm). Maximum width or length is 96” (244 cm).

There is a $20 submission fee per quilt.

The works must be made between 2017 and 2021.

Submit 2 photographs for each piece (an overall photograph of the work and a close-up detail showing the stitching) and an artist’s statement that describes the inspiration for the work.

End of registration: May 7, 2021

 

TACTILE ARCHITECTURE™

Buildings have a long history of inspiring the creative designs of quiltmakers. In the 19th century, American quilters developed classic architectural patterns such as Log Cabin, Schoolhouse, and Brick Wall. This exhibit challenges quiltmakers to create works based on architectural themes and inspirations.

2 entries per person maximum.

Minimum width is 36” (91 cm). Maximum width or length is 96” (244 cm).

There is a $20 submission fee per quilt.

The works must be made between 2017 and 2021.

Submit 2 photographs for each piece (an overall photograph of the work and a close-up detail showing the stitching) and an artist’s statement that describes the inspiration for the work.

End of registration: May 7, 2021

 

To give you some idea about the high standards of the International Quilt Festival I found this video by Cara Sorella showing quilts of the 2018 show.

 

If you are going to try to get your quilt in one of these exhibits I will keep my fingers crossed for you.

 

A cover for your calendar

Are you a calendar nerd like I am? Every year beginning in October I spend a fair amount of time looking at calendars in shops and on the Internet. And each year I buy one or two new ones just because – nerd I told you! But I am always more interested in the interior of the calendar than in the look of the cover. Often they look rather plain on the outside.

So I decided that my calendar needs a cover showing my passion for fabrics. And especially for this cute fabric with colorful paw prints. This cover is so easy to do and just needs about half an hour. It’s a great way to give your calendar, your notebook, your sketchbook or a book you are giving as a present a new look. And you can even combine it with a corresponding bookmark.

 

And this is how to do it:

Measure the outside of your calender, don’t add any seam allowance at this point. Measure the complete width including backside, spine and frontside – a tape measure works best for this.

Add 1 inch (2 cm) to the width and to the height for seam allowance and cut 3 pieces with the seam allowance added from the chosen fabric. I did cut all three pieces from the paw print but you can use a contrasting color for the inside piece and/or the flaps.

If you want to make your cover softer cut a piece of batting in the same size.

Cut one piece of the fabric into two halves. My piece has a width of 28 cm (see measure tape in the first picture) and 2 cm of seam allowance which makes 30 cms. So I cut 2 pieces of 15 cms.

Fold each of these 2 cut pieces into half, right side out and iron them. These are your 2 flaps.

Lay out your piece of batting (if you use one). Lay the first piece of fabric (which is the outside of your cover) on the batting right side up. Lay the two flaps on the ends of the fabric and align the open ends with the end of the fabric (the scissors are just to show you where the flaps are positioned).

Sew around the cover leaving approximately 3 inches (8 cm) open in the middle of one of the long sides. Backstitch at the beginning and the end of the seam to secure the thread. Leave 10 inches (25 cm) of thread at the end of the seam.

Trim the batting almost to the seam and cut off the four corners. Be careful not to cut into the seam.

Carefully turn the right side of the cover out through the opening, iron and close the opening with hand stitches using the leftover thread.

Iron once more and put your calender, book, notebook or sketchbook into the new cover.

 

I’m linking this to “Off the Wall Friday”, “Whoop Whoop Party” and “Brag about your beauties”.

Only a few days left to see these quilts

Two great quiltshows are going into their final days.

At the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, Kentucky you can see the whole collection of Inspired by Endangered Species. 182 quilts 24 x 24 inches, each of them depicting  endangered animals, insects, flowers or sealife. It’s not only about these beautiful quilts but also about the stories behind them which are educational and sometimes heartbreaking. If you have any chance go see them before the show is closing on January 12.

"Loggerhead Turtle" by Karin Täuber, Virginia, USA

“Loggerhead Turtle” by Karin Täuber, Virginia, USA
can be seen in the “Inspired by Endangered Species” show

 

At the Schweinfurth Art Center in Auburn, New York the 38th annual show of Quilts = Art = Quilts 2020 can be seen until January 10. 71 art quilts from around the world are on display – quilt art at it’s best. Watch this video to see the winning quilts.

If you have the chance go see the shows, if not you still can visit the websites. The Schweinfurth Art Center (https://schweinfurthartcenter.org) has a virtual walk through the galleries on its site and at https://inspiredbyendangeredspecies.blogspot.com you can see some of the quilts from the show.

And whatever you do – stay safe!

 

Welcome and a happy New Year!

A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF YOU!

May it be full of creativity, fabric and threads.

And welcome to this blog where I will be posting about all things quilty. You can look forward to patterns and tutorials, I will launch a ‘Block of the Month’ soon, there will be talks about quilts, quilters and quiltbooks, you can search for quilting events in the calendar, I will report about quiltshows and post interesting bits and pieces.

I hope you will follow me along – see you soon!