I am missing the Quiltshows

I am really missing the quiltshows! Although I like the online events and really loved some of them (thank you Modern Quilt Guild!), I miss the camaraderie, the exitement, the laughter, the friendship, the harmony, the emotions, the joy, the feeling of belonging together, ……… I could go on and on.

While browsing YouTube I found this great film made for the PBS Short Film Festival in 2020 about Quilt Week in Paducah and it brought all these feelings back to me. So much so that I was close to tears sometimes. It really shows very well what quilting is all about.

If you are missing all the great shows as well – here’s the video. Enjoy!

40 years – a Quiltshow

As we still can not travel (at least here in Europe) many quiltshows are cancelled at the moment. This is sad but understandable. But …… I do have several thousand pictures of quiltshows in my photo archive. So how about revisiting some shows of the last years?

In 2019 the Quilters’ Guild of Great Britain celebrated their 40th birthday with a quiltshow at the Festival of Quilts in Birmingham, titled “Spotlight @ 40”. The quilters were asked to interpret 40 in the most creative way. One side of the quilt had to measure 40 inches. The quilts were all made by British members of the guild and they went into the permanent collection of the Quilters’ Guild.

Here are some of the beautiful quilts:


“40 days and 40 nights” by Cag Tyndall
Artist’s statement: Work on this quilt began during the spring of 2019 when my mind turned to the 40 days and 40 nights of Lent. I wanted to celebrate the wonderful variety of colour and texture of different fabrics, as well as how they respond differently to dyes. Linen, cotton, silk, and mixed fabrics were all hand dyed. There are 40 appliquéd circles of each colour. The piece has been lightly quilted. 


“Circuit XL” by Marion McCrindle
Artist’s statement: Each year is a new cycle, hence there are 40 circles to represent 40 years of the guild’s life so far. Just as each year brings its own challenges and developments, so the circles have different patterns, colours and are made from a range of materials: paper, thread, fabric, wood and metal. Some years are good – some do not go as planned. In the life of the guild, some years have been highly successful, others less so. The circle has no end, something we hope for the guild. The circle of friends I found in the guild has a value above rubies. The circles represent a year—each different: some good, some bad, significant years, quiet years.


“40 Layers of Quilting” by Jo Avery
Artist’s statement: When I thought about the last 40 years of quilting and The Quilters’ Guild, I imagined them as layers of sedimentary rock as found in an archaeological dig. The resulting quilt shows 40 different layers of patchwork techniques including miniature log cabins and flying geese, plus layers of improvised and curved piecing. Appliqué, hand quilting and other embellishments have been added to some layers to represent as many aspects of quilting as possible. A fissure was created through the layers with the two pieces brought back together again with buttons representing the ‘make do and mend’ starting point of our patchwork tradition.

Jo Avery wrote a blog post about how she made this quilt and what a terrible mistake she made, which resulted in an even more interesting quilt. Don’t miss it, it’s a lesson in creativity.


“Belonging” by Lesley Brankin
The second line of The Quilters’ Guild Mission Statement reads: “We bring together quilters in a spirit of friendship and learning. We promote quilt-making in all its forms across the UK.” In the spirit of coming together in the guild’s 40th anniversary year, the maker invited fellow regional members to donate squares of cream/white fabric and provide a single descriptive word summing up what membership of the British Guild means to them. The squares were pieced together as a background and the tallied words featured in the ‘spotlight’.

 
“Spotlight on The Guild” by Anne Gosling
Artist’s statement: When I thought about the theme Spotlight@40, I decided to put the spotlight on The Guild, in particular guild membership, to celebrate the 40th anniversary. A crossword in guild colours seemed the most appropriate way to express all that the guild has to offer its members. The quilt is machine pieced but as I love to stitch by hand, the letters are hand appliquéd. The guild logo is the basis of the quilting design which is also hand stitched.

 
“Headline News” by Sabi Westoby
Artist’s statement: The theme was interpreted by focusing on world events that took place 40 years ago. For (british) quilters, the highlight of 1979 was, undoubtedly, the formation of The Quilters’ Guild and this work marks that exciting event. I also refer to other contemporary cultural, historical and political events that still seem significant to me 40 years later.  Red text, a reference to the ruby anniversary, was digitally printed on cotton sateen and the piece was stab stitched by hand.

 
“QGBI Excels” by Jeni Rutherford
Artist’s statement: The inspiration for this hanging is The Quilters’ Guild and how patchwork has evolved in the last 40 years. In 1979 contemporary work was unusual but now the Contemporary Quilt Group is one of the guild’s specialist groups. The hanging is in two parts: the front features QGBI, the guild’s ‘initials’. The back features traditional block designs—where the guild began—but the single colour blocks and quilting are contemporary. It represents all the people working away, in York and around the UK, who are generally unseen but make the guild what it is today. The motifs feature 40 in Arabic and Roman numerals. XL can be pronounced excel—what guild members try to do.

 
“40 Endangered in 40” by Melanie Missin-Keating
Artist’s statement: In the 40 years since The Quilters’ Guild began, the 40 animals, plants and insects shown in the quilt have become endangered to the point of extinction. Will they be extinct in the next 40 years? Can we save them? 


“Region 3 from the Air” by Grace Meijer
Artist’s statement: The landscape of Region 3 was the inspiration for this piece—the beautiful rolling landscape with its many colours, from the white chalk to the acid yellow rapeseed and the little hamlets and farms tucked into the hills. It is also the area where The Quilters’ Guild started; the first AGM was held in Winchester.


“Birthday Celebrations” by Aoibhínn Murray, Ciaran Behan & Aoife Behan
Here the 40th anniversary of The Quilters’ Guild is celebrated as a quilted birthday cake. The cake has three tiers, and each of the three Young Quilters involved designed and created their own section before joining them together. A sewing machine as the cake topper features a patchwork fabric flowing from it, displaying printed photos of 40 quilts from the past 40 years.

This is one thing that I like especially about the British Guild – it really fosters the young quilters. From 5 to 18 years the membership in the guild is free and there are special workshops for them. It’s really a great way to bring children and young adults to quilting. The above quilt is a perfect example of how much this pays off.

So this was our first, private, little quiltshow – with more to come. Come back to check or – even better – subscribe to this blog (enter your e-mail address in the box on the right) so that you don’t miss them.

I’m linking this to Off the Wall Friday, Can I get a Whoop Whoop and to Brag about your Beauties.

 

Book of the Month: Stunning 3-D Quilts by Ruth Ann Berry

Ok, I will confess that the cover of this book was the main reason why a bought it. The quilt looks so complex and the title states it’s “simplyfied”. So my curiosity won.

When you open the book the table of contents will take your breath away. I immediately wanted to make every single quilt of this book.

There are 12 projects but each of them has three further options in different colors – 48 possibilities all in all.

All the quilts are solely made of 60° triangles.
The downside: you need a lot of these triangles – a lot of cutting and a lot of sewing. And every triangle has 2 sides on the bias.
The upside: Ruth Ann Berry explains in every detail how to cut, organize and sew the triangles. And there are no inset seams.

To sew one of these quilts you will need a lot of patience (the quilts consist of 800 to 1000 triangles),
a brand new blade in your rotary cutter and
you have to be prepared to unsew some seams (I think it’s really easy to switch two triangles which will ruin the design).

At the moment I don’t have the peace of mind to tackle such a project but if you do you will soon be the proud owner of a spectacular quilt.

Stunning 3-D Quilts Simplified
by Ruth Ann Berry
C&T Publishing, 2020
ISBN: 978-1-61745-959-7

 

Favorite Quilt

QuiltFest on Instagram asked for my favorite finish. That is an easy one for me because this quilt is the first one I ever made that I really love. I like most of my quilts but I usually see something I could have made better. Not with this one. It’s a Mondrian inspired quilt I designed myself – a gift for my nephew who’s an artist himself and enjoys and values quilts.

The big and medium blocks are log cabin blocks with different fabrics but in the same hue. Its machine sewn and machine quilted. Made in 2020.

 

 

New York City Quilt

I finally finished this quilt. I bought the panel a couple of years ago but had no idea how to turn it into a full sized quilt. But then my daughter asked for a quilt incorporating this panel and as mothers do, I obliged. I looked around for ideas and found some other panels with 9patch borders. I really liked that. And I had a second panel of Manhattan. So I made some borders – with parts of the second panel in the 9patch border and voilá – it worked out perfectly. I backed the top with batting and dark grey polar fleece and had a perfect birthday gift for cold winter nights.

If you want to make a quilt with a 9patch border the best way to calculate the size of all parts needed is to work from the inside out and then from the outside in. What does this mean?

I started with the size of my panel and then added borders until I reached the quiltsize I wanted. And then I worked backwards, adapting the width of the borders for easier cutting. The 9patch border was planned 8″ (20 cm) wide which means cutting the patches 3⅙” (8,17 cm). So I adjusted the 9patch border to a width of 6″ (15 cm) and I could cut the patchtes 2½” (6,5 cm). Much easier to do. But of course I had to adjust the outer grey border and make it 2″ (5 cm) wider. If you work back in from the outside you can finally adjust the size of the center panel so that everything will fit together perfectly. As a final step I sketched the whole top on graph paper with one square representing one patch of the 9patch.

If you still have a beautiful panel somewhere in your stash and you don’t know how to make a quilt out of it – consider this way of enlarging it. It’s quick, it’s fun and it only needs a few calculations.

 

While surfing the Internet …

… I just found a link that had me clicking for the last couple of hours. A lot to see – beautiful art quilts, traditional quilts, videos about quilt artists and a lot of information. And this link is

https://quiltnsw.com

It’s the website of QuiltNSW – the Quilter’s Guild of New South Wales in Australia. Not only is this guild running special shows and a lot of challenges but it also plays a major role in the founding and the running of Quilt Australia, the Australian Council of Quilters.

If you just click the link above you come to the landing page where you can see all the quilts of the new special show “The New Quilt 2021”. “The New Quilt 2021 is a juried survey exhibition showcasing the art of quilting that reflects the richness and diversity of contemporary expressions of the quilt medium in Australia.” Be sure to read the artist’s statements to learn what the quilts are about (Covid, the devastating bush fires of last season, but also of nature and the joy of creating).

Click on “Exhibition” in the menu bar and then “The New Quilt” and you will find the catalogue to this exhibit. And if you go right down to the bottom and click on “Miss Grace’s Quilt” you will come to the “Australien Museums and Galleries” where you will find antique quilts with their stories.

Back in the “Exhibition” menu you will find challenges with an abundance of challenge quilts and a link to the Sydney Quilt Show 2019 (as 2020 was cancelled) with all the winning quilts.

If you still have time click “Links” in the menu bar. There you will find their YouTubeChannel with interesting artist talks, a link to the blog and to the Facebook Group and last but not least to the State Guilds of Australia where you can loose yourself in more beautiful quilts and interesting blog articles (i.e. the Canberra Quilter’s site with all the winning quilts of their exhibitions).

Don’t tell me that I didn’t warn you. If you go to this website it’s like Alice following the White Rabbit into Wonderland. I will meet you there.

 

Craft in America: Quilts

Today I have a real treat for you. This PBS program is about American quilts – from the quilts from Gee’s Bend to the contemporary art of Victoria Findlay Wolfe, from quilts from Native Americans to the collection of the International Quilt Museum in Lincoln, Nebraska, and so much more.

What a great film! It’s about the design process, the thoughts behind the quilts, the love for what we do.

Grab a cup of coffee and enjoy an hour that’s only about quilts.

 

 

Quiltshow: Road to California

Each year Road to California is one of the most eagerly awaited quiltshows. This year’s “in person” show was postponed to 2022 (January 19 – 22, 2022) but the organizers created a virtual experience called Road@Home.

Road@Home offers an abundance of quilting classes where everyone – from the beginner to the advanced, art quilters, modern quilters and quilters intending to open a business – will find at least one, but generally quite a few classes. And although the event will take place from January 20 to January 23, 2021 I think you can still register for some classes.

And now you are in for some real treat – the winning quilts of Road to California 2020:

https://online.roadtocalifornia.com/awardwinnersroad.php?con=31

You still want more? Here are the winners of 2019:

https://online.roadtocalifornia.com/awardwinnersroad.php?con=30

I assume you are as stunned as I am by all these beauties. And as inspired. So please excuse me I have to go and cut some fabric.