Book of the Month: Stunning 3-D Quilts by Ruth Ann Berry

Ok, I will confess that the cover of this book was the main reason why a bought it. The quilt looks so complex and the title states it’s “simplyfied”. So my curiosity won.

When you open the book the table of contents will take your breath away. I immediately wanted to make every single quilt of this book.

There are 12 projects but each of them has three further options in different colors – 48 possibilities all in all.

All the quilts are solely made of 60° triangles.
The downside: you need a lot of these triangles – a lot of cutting and a lot of sewing. And every triangle has 2 sides on the bias.
The upside: Ruth Ann Berry explains in every detail how to cut, organize and sew the triangles. And there are no inset seams.

To sew one of these quilts you will need a lot of patience (the quilts consist of 800 to 1000 triangles),
a brand new blade in your rotary cutter and
you have to be prepared to unsew some seams (I think it’s really easy to switch two triangles which will ruin the design).

At the moment I don’t have the peace of mind to tackle such a project but if you do you will soon be the proud owner of a spectacular quilt.

Stunning 3-D Quilts Simplified
by Ruth Ann Berry
C&T Publishing, 2020
ISBN: 978-1-61745-959-7

 

BOM 2021: Star #4

Another fast and easy stars but with great impact.

Cut (all measurements include ¼ inch (0,75 cm) seam allowance)
1 square 3⅛ x 3⅛ inches (8,75 x 8,75 cm) in blue,
1 square 3⅛ x 3⅛ inches (8,75 x 8,75 cm) in pink,
2 squares 3⅛ x 3⅛ inches (8,75 x 8,75 cm) in yellow and
4 squares 3⅛ x 3⅛ inches (8,75 x 8,75 cm) in darkblue (background fabric).
Cut each of these 12 squares diagonally to get 24 triangles.

Cut
2 squares 2¾ x 2¾ inches (7,5 x 7,5 cm) in blue,
2 squares 2¾ x 2¾ inches (7,5 x 7,5 cm) in pink and
4 squares 2¾ x 2¾ inches (7,5 x 7,5 cm) in darkblue (background fabric).

Sew each blue, pink and yellow triangle to a darkblue one. Press and cut off the dog ears. Trim the squares to the size of 2¾ x 2¾ inches (7,5 x 7,5 cm) if necessary. Be careful to line up the diagonal line on your ruler with the diagonal seam.

Lay out the star as shown on the picture below.

Sew the squares together to make 4 rows. Be careful not to mix up your layout.

I do iron each row, pressing the seam allowances to the right in row 1 and 3 and to the left in row 2 and 4. So I can butt the seam allowances against each other and get nice corners.

Sew the rows together for the finished block.

Take 4 of the strips 11 x 1 inches (28 x 2,5 cm) that you cut from the background fabric previously (see introduction to the BOM here) and sew 2 of them to opposite sides of your block. They are a little bit too long – shorten them to the block size. Sew the 2 remaining strips to the other sides of the block and shorten if necessary. Finished!

If you just found this BOM you can find the general instructions and the previous stars on the Free BOM 2021 page on top.

I would love to see your finished star-blocks. Please post them in the comments at TheQuiltingSpace’s Facebook page, tag me on Instagram @thequiltingspace and/or use the hashtag #thequiltingspace.

See you in May for star #5.

I’m linking this to Off the Wall Friday, Can I get a Whoop Whoop and to Brag about your Beauties.

 

Textile Artist Sheila Hicks

Sheila Hicks is an American textile artist. Since 1963 she lives and works in Paris. She is known for her innovative and experimental weavings and sculptural textile art that incorporate distinctive colors, natural materials, and personal narratives.

Hicks’ art ranges from the minuscule to the monumental. Her materials vary as much as the size and shape of her work. Having begun her career as a painter, she has remained close to color, using it as a language she builds, weaves and wraps to create her pieces.

Hicks’ work is characterised by her direct examination of indigenous weaving practices in the countries of their origin. This has led her travel through five continents, studying the local culture in Mexico, France, Morocco, India, Chile, Sweden, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Japan and South Africa, developing relationships with designers, artisans, industrialists, architects, politicians and cultural leaders.

The MAK (Museum of Applied Art) in Vienna dedicates a solo exhibition to Sheila Hicks’ work. Due to Covid the museum is closed. Bad for the museum but an advantage for us as the museum created a virtual 3D tour through the exhibition and therefore we all have the chance to see it.

Click here to stroll through the exhibition. Enjoy!

 

The 100 Days Project

For years now I’m discussing with myself if I should participate in the 100 days project. It’s about committing yourself to 100 days of doing something – painting a picture, cooking a soup, sketching a flower, … And of course a lot of quilters take part. The project usually starts in April but this year it was advanced to end of January. It’s a great way to work in series and to grow in whatever you are doing.

The last years I always had an idea about what to do but my inner monkey always told me about to much work, about not being able to finish and about a lot of other reasons not to start it. And in 2021, as in all the other years, I did not take part but looked at all the great projects on Instagram (#the100daysproject2021) with envy. I especially love the project of Wendy Gratz who does a patchwork bird every day (@wendygratz).

So today – without much thinking – I decided to do the 100 days project as well. As today is day 101 of the year it’s a good starting point with the project running from day 101 to day 200.

I wanted something easy and fast, something with one theme but different possibilities. And I chose leaves. One leaf each day. 100 leaves that may or may not end up in a quilt.

This is my first leaf

Each day I will post the leaf to my Instagram account (@thequiltingspace) and each Sunday there will be on overview of the week’s leaves here on the blog. Wish me luck and persistence.

 

Art quilts over the years

I found this video by Martha Sielman (executive director of SAQA) where she shows art quilts from 1960 up to now. It’s interesting how styles, fabrics and even sizes have changed over this time. The video itself runs for 50 minutes with another 15 minutes for questions and answers.

So grab a cup of coffee and join me watching …