BOM 2021: Bonusblock Star #13

As promised there is a bonus block and here it is

I really love this block. Sewn a little bit larger it would also be a perfect little wallhanging – maybe with the center pink square made out of 4 little stars similar to the pink one. Hmmm … there might be a miniquilt in my future.

But now let’s start sewing the block.

Cutting

From the lightblue fabric cut
2 squares 3⅞ x 3⅞ inches (10,5 x 10,5 cm), cut both of them diagonally to get 4 triangles.

From the yellow fabric cut
1 square 4¼ x 4¼ inches (11,75 x 11,75 cm), cut this square on both diagonals into 4 triangles
1 square 2 x 2 inches (5,5 x 5,5 cm)
1 square 2⅜ x 2⅜ inches (6,5 x 6,5 cm), cut diagonally to get 2 triangles

From the pink fabric cut
2 squares 2 x 2 inches (5,5 x 5,5 cm)
1 square 3 x 3 inches (7 x 7 cm)
1 square 2⅜ x 2⅜ inches (6,5 x 6,5 cm), cut diagonally into 2 triangles

From the darkblue background fabric cut
1 square 4¼ x 4¼ inches (11,75 x 11,75 cm), cut this square on both diagonals into 4 triangles
4 squares 3½ x 3½ inches (9,5 x 9,5 cm)

Sewing

Sew together a darkblue and a large yellow triangle as shown in the pichture below. Make 4 units.

Join 2 of these with a lightblue triangle along the long side.

Take one of the pink squares 2 x 2 inches (5,5 x 5,5 cm) and mark a diagonal line on the backside of the fabric.

Lay this square on a lightblue triangle, right sides together, as shown in the picture below. Sew on the marked line.

Cut off the corner leaving ¼ inch (7,5 mm) seam allowance and press the pink triangle to the outside. You get a two-colored triangle.

Join this triangle with a yellow-darkblue one on the long side.

The fourth point of the star is a little bit trickier. Take the pink square 3 x 3 inches (7 x 7 cm) and mark the seam allowance (¼ inch or 7,5 mm) on the right side of the square.

Take a lightblue triangle and mark a sewing line measuring 1¾ inches (4,75 cm) from the 90°corner.

Now lay the pink square onto the blue triangle as shown in the picture below (right sides together) and pin the two patches together exactely on the marked sewing lines on both pieces.

Sew on the marked line.

Turn the pink square and check that it covers the lightblue triangle til the end. Press the pink square outward.

Turn over and cut the pink square to the size of the lightblue triangle. Then cut away the lightblue triangle covered by the pink one (leaving a seam allowance). Now you have a two-colored triangle.

Join this with the last yellow-darkblue triangle.

Sew together 2 pink and 2 yellow triangles to get 2 squares.

Join these 2 squares and the remaining yellow and pink squares into a 4patch.

Now you have 9 squares.

Joint these into rows and then into the finished block.

Take 4 of the strips 11 x 1 inches (28 x 2,5 cm) that you cut from the background fabric previously (see introduction to the BOM here) and sew 2 of them to opposite sides of your block. They are a little bit too long – shorten them to the block size. Sew the 2 remaining strips to the other sides of the block and shorten if necessary. Finished!

I would love to see your finished star-blocks. Please post them in the comments at TheQuiltingSpace’s Facebook page, tag me on Instagram @thequiltingspace and/or use the hashtag #thequiltingspace.

 

BOM 2021: Star #12

This is my star for December.

Cutting

From the yellow fabric cut 4 rectangles 2¼ x 4½ inches (6 x 12 cm).
Cut 2 of them diagonally from the upper left to the lower right corner and cut the other 2 from the upper right to the lower left corner.

Cut 1 pink square 3½ x 3½ inches (9,5 x 9,5 cm).

Cut 4 lightblue squares 2 x 2 inches (5,5 x 5,5 cm).

From the darkblue background fabric cut
4 squares 3½ x 3½ inches (9,5 x 9,5 cm) and
4 rectangles 2¼ x 4½ inches (6 x 12 cm) – cut 2 rectangles diagonally from the upper left to the lower right corner and cut the other 2 from the upper right to the lower left corner.

Sewing
Before we begin to sew we have some marking to do – of course on the wrong side of the fabric.

On the triangles that form the star points mark the seam allowances in the pointy corners.
On each lightblue square draw a diagonal line.

Now let’s sew the star points.
Pin a darkblue to a yellow triangle always pairing 2 different triangles (one cut from left to right and one cut from right to left). On both fabrics pin exactely through the points where the seam allowances cross.

Sew the pieces together, open them up and press. Sew all 8 points.

Join 2 star points along the darkblue side. Make 4 units.

Lay a lightblue square on the pink square and sew on the marked line.

Cut off the outer triangle with ¼ inch (7,5 mm) seam allowance.

Press the blue triangle outward.

Sew the 3 remaining corners in the same way.

Now you have 9 squares

that you just have to join into rows

and then to the finished star block.

Take 4 of the strips 11 x 1 inches (28 x 2,5 cm) that you cut from the background fabric previously (see introduction to the BOM here) and sew 2 of them to opposite sides of your block. They are a little bit too long – shorten them to the block size. Sew the 2 remaining strips to the other sides of the block and shorten if necessary. Finished!

I would love to see your finished star-blocks. Please post them in the comments at TheQuiltingSpace’s Facebook page, tag me on Instagram @thequiltingspace and/or use the hashtag #thequiltingspace.

 

Advent Calendar

Today is December 1st and this marks the official beginning of Christmas time in our house.

A tradition in Europe is the Advent calendar. When I was young it was a picture (usually of a winter or Christmas scene) where you could open little windows and in each window you got a picture of something Christmas-y (a candle, an ornament, Christmas cookies, and so on). 24 windows to open and then Christmas was here.

This simple calendar of my youth morphed into something a little bit more so nowadays many Advent calendars consist of 24 little parcels filled with small gifts and/or sweets.

Each year I make an Advent calendar for my daughter. This year 24 snowmen inhabit her desk carrying some pages of a Christmas novel and some sweets in their bellies.

I really loved doing these little fellows. I crocheted a hat and a matching scarf for each one (although it took me only 20 minutes to crochet one set that means 8 hours of crocheting all in all).

Here are some of the guys

and here is the whole gang.

And each year I get an Advent calendar from my daughter as well. This year there are 24 small houses filled with goodies.

What about these scrolls you want to know? Well, I love to read (and quite a lot I have to say) and my daughter is a bookworm as well. So for many years now my Advent calendar consists of scrolls with the first sentence of one of my (more than 800) books and I try to find, guess or know the book (I have to brag that I know quite a lot of first sentences). Oh, I just love this and am usually rather sad when this time of the year is over.

I wish you all a merry pre-Christmas time and hope you all have an Advent calendar as well.

 

BOM 2021: Star #11

For November it will be an easy-piecy star but with a great impact.

Cutting
All the measurements include ¼ inch (7,5 mm) seam allowance.

From the yellow fabric cut 8 squares 2⅜ x 2⅜ inches (6,5 x 6,5 cm) cut once diagonally.
From the orange fabric cut 8 squares 2⅜ x 2⅜ inches (6,5 x 6,5 cm) cut once diagonally.
From the pink fabric cut 4 squares 2⅜ x 2⅜ inches (6,5 x 6,5 cm) cut once diagonally.
From the light-blue fabric cut 4 squares 2⅜ x 2⅜ inches (6,5 x 6,5 cm) cut once diagonally.
From the dark-blue background fabric cut
8 squares 2⅜ x 2⅜ inches (6,5 x 6,5 cm) cut once diagonally and
4 squares 2 x 2 inches (5,5 x 5,5 cm).

Sewing

Join the triangles on the long side to get squares.

Sew
8 orange-background squares
8 yellow-background squares
4 orange-lightblue squares
4 pink-lightblue squares
4 yellow-pink squares
4 orange-yellow squares

Lay out the block as shown in the picture below. Be careful to get the right squares in the right orientation on the right place. The best is to have the pieces near to your machine so that you can sew a seam and put the pieces back on the correct place so that you don’t mix up the squares.

Check once again that everything is ok and then sew the squares into rows.

Join the rows into the finished block.

Take 4 of the strips 11 x 1 inches (28 x 2,5 cm) that you cut from the background fabric previously (see introduction to the BOM here) and sew 2 of them to opposite sides of your block. They are a little bit too long – shorten them to the block size. Sew the 2 remaining strips to the other sides of the block and shorten if necessary. Finished!

I would love to see your finished star-blocks. Please post them in the comments at TheQuiltingSpace’s Facebook page, tag me on Instagram @thequiltingspace and/or use the hashtag #thequiltingspace.

 

Finally! A Quilt Show!

I was at a small quilt show yesterday. After the long Covid pause it was great to get in contact with other quilters again and to look at quilts and fabric.

Here are some of the quilts shown:“Begegnungen” (“Encounters”) by Roswitha Schmit – a striking modern quilt.

 

“Und jeden Tag geht die Sonne auf” (“And each day the sun rises”) by Zuzana Cider.
This was a full size quilt but imagine that one as a baby quilt – it would be perfect.

 

“On such a Winter’s Day” by Roswitha Schmit.
Snow is not a common thing around here so when it fell Roswitha grabbed her camera and went for a walk. The pictures were printed on fabric and sewn into a quilt. Buttons, sequins and strips of organza add the shimmer and glitter of snow. A beautiful quilt!

 

Elisabeth Zechmeister did this 365blocks-quilt.
For a whole year she got a quilt block pattern each day but sewing them took her almost 4 years. What an effort – but well worth it.

 

Another eye-catching quilt by Roswitha Schmit.

 

“Let the Sunshine in” by Zuzana Cider.
Little fabric squares sewn into strips make a great impression. The colors of the fabric correspond perfectly with the fall colors outside.

 

And last but not least this is “Fireworks” by Roswitha Schmit.
She is a master in foundation piecing and this was one of a few mandalas exhibited, each one more stunning than the other.

All in all a small show but well worth the visit. Thank you to the Flic-Flac-Quilters for their efforts!